2016 Benefit Golf Tournament

Come join us for our Benefit Golf Tounament
DATE: Friday, June 17, 2016 TIME: Registration & breakfast – 7:45am Tee off – 8:30am
LOCATION: Nutter’s Chapel Golf Club FORMAT: 3 person scramble COST: $300 per team
Closest to the pin, longest drive, lunch & prizes awarded after play. CASH PRIZES!!!

Sponsorship Packages
PAR ($200)*BIRDIE ($400)*EAGLE ($700)*HOLE IN ONE ($1000)

Her Valentine

She’s been alone for years, but not in a way that many people noticed. It’s hard to be married to someone who has never in their life been wrong, at least not to their own mind. Her efforts as a parent were belittled or ignored, unless something went wrong and then they were blamed for the result. There’s been no one to share the joys with, because the husband hasn’t cared about that. The once shiny dreams and hopes for the future were long ago crushed underfoot, rather than being protected and nourished as they grew. This gradual tearing down wasn’t easily identifiable.

Remember the Purple

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month, and the color for domestic violence awareness ribbons is purple. This is a slightly unfortunate coincidence for those involved in the field of Domestic Violence Advocacy, because October is also known far and wide as Breast Cancer Awareness month. Through a stroke of marketing genius, our lives are infiltrated with pink this month. Pink is everywhere, from products we buy at the store, to the football field, proudly displayed by athletes.

20 Years of Advocacy

She sat with a cup of coffee, tapping her fingers against the surface of the table, and swinging her leg crossed over the other one. She was softly singing along with the radio in the background “Living on toast and time”.  The actual song is “living on Tulsa time” but I don’t know anyone that sang that correctly. She had come over to talk to my mother. She was a friend, the girlfriend of someone related to my stepdad.  I don’t remember all the words she said, or all the words my mother said to her. I was just a kid, only half paying attention.

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Whose Fault is it?

In recent news, a spotlight has been placed on domestic violence. It’s as if the outside world is seeing what so many people keep quiet in the dark. The public is outraged, an opinionated. This “new” problem demands answers, everyone wants a solution. Everyone wants to point a finger at someone else.  “That victim should have left her abuser!” or “That employer needs to fire that employee!” are common things I’ve been hearing. We’re so quick to blame victims, even to the slightest degree.

The Great Escape

August 29th, 2015

9am to 3pm 

Conway Expo Center

$5 Admission

Massages, Facials, Haircuts and Styling $10 each Shopping Proceeds benefit emergency shelter program. For more info call 501-358-6219

The Lie

When you are in an abusive relationship, the abuser holds the power; it is after all, power that the abuser wields best of all weapons. You come to a point, whether it is early in the relationship, or many years into the relationship, that you start to consider getting out. Leaving. What will this leaving thing be like? Maybe you’ve left before, only to return.  For whatever reason, financial dependency, emotional attachment, or fear, you felt you had to go back.

Support the Women's Shelter of Central Arkansas

If at least 50 supporters show up and eat at McAlister’s Deli on Tuesday between 5-8pm, McAlister’s Deli will donate 10% of the night’s proceeds to benefit Conway’s local shelter!

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

5-8 PM

McAlister’s Deli

2465 Sanders Rd • Conway, AR 72032

What Happens Here Doesn’t Stay Here

We’ve all heard the saying, “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas!” or some version thereof.  Thinking about that topic got me to thinking about the shelter. Certainly there are aspects of shelter life about which that phrase could be said. What happens at the Women’s Shelter stays at the Women’s Shelter! More importantly though, I think so much of what happens at the Women’s Shelter does NOT stay there.

What it's All About

When people think of a shelter program, I can only wonder what they imagine. In their minds does it seem institutional? Does the problem of domestic violence seem abstract, as if it's something you see on TV. but never really come into contact with? How is the work done at our program viewed by the general public? Do they think our work makes a difference? Do they really understand what it's all about?

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